Summer Vacation Research Scholarships

UNSW Science offers highly competitive summer research scholarships to currently enrolled undergraduate students who are considering postgraduate research in the future. This Scheme enables students to gain valuable research experience.

For scholarship details and application, please click here.

SVRS Projects in Aviation

Global Airline Alliances have been in existence for several decades. Anecdotal evidence has suggested that membership of a global alliance is necessary to increase airlines’ marketing and sales reach. Recent research at UNSW Aviation suggests that this preconception might be incorrect, with the research team suggesting that there is little evidence for improved profitability from being a member of a major global alliance, and that it might even reduce profit in some cases. This research could assist regulators to be less cautious in reviewing competitive advantage from airline alliances. For further information click here or contact Ian Douglas (02 9385 7186 or ian.douglas@unsw.edu.au) or David Tan (02 9385 7182 or david.tan@unsw.edu.au).

Negotiations between tourist destinations and airlines can sometimes be difficult due to the financial risks for airlines in committing expensive resources for an uncertain return. Tourism destinations often bemoan insufficient airline services for lack of tourism growth. A team at UNSW Aviation has developed a risk model which assists evaluation of new routes for application of a risk sharing model and evaluation of impacts on an airline’s route network. For further information click here or contact David Tan (02 9385 7182 or david.tan@unsw.edu.au) or Tay Koo (9385 6737 or t.koo@unsw.edu.au)

Thinking outside the box: is there a link between international business travel and air freight? These two aspects of the international airline business are not instinctively linked and few studies have examined them together. UNSW Aviation academics have tested whether such a link might exist, and surprisingly there does seem to be a strong links between freight and business travel internationally. This could have implications for how airlines evaluate new opportunities for both. For further information click here or contact David Tan (02 9385 7182 or david.tan@unsw.edu.au)

Weather effects on coastal communities become front page news whenever a cyclone or extreme weather event occurs eg the 2016 east coast low caused storm erosion of beaches and undermining or houses at Narrabeen in Sydney. UNSW Aviation has an aircraft equipped with special equipment that can quickly map the coastline before and after such events. This helps Federal, State and Local governments to plan and remediate weather climate change effects. The UNSW aircraft can scan wide areas in a single scan, which is significantly quicker than using drones. For further information click here or contact Jason Middleton (02 9385 6747 or j.middleton@unsw.edu.au)

Aviators separated by a common language! The globally agreed language for aviation operations is English, but not all aviators have English as a first language. Good clear and concise communication is essential for safe aviation operations. A number of accidents world wide have had language issues involved in the causal chain of events. UNSW Aviation recently adopted a different approach to assessing aviation language communications, by using an interdisciplinary approach involving not just aviators, but language specialists. This book sets a foundation for investigating improvements in aviation communication. For further information click here or contact Brett Molesworth (02 9385 6757 or b.molesworth@unsw.edu.au)

What about those fantastic Air New Zealand safety briefings? Does the trend for airlines to produce passenger safety briefing video extravaganzas featuring famous film themes, actors and sportsmen or women improve passengers’ retention and understanding of key safety messages like evacuation procedures? Recent research by UNSW might surprise you. For further information click here or contact Brett Molesworth (02 9385 6757 or b.molesworth@unsw.edu.au)

Stress from noise is a well known phenomenon. UNSW Aviation researchers have looked at the effect of noise cancelling headsets on pilots understanding communications, especially if not a native English speaker. For further information click here or contact Brett Molesworth (02 9385 6757 or b.molesworth@unsw.edu.au)

Moody Blues. We all know that we operate less effectively if our mood is down. Recent research by UNSW Aviation has investigated whether mood induced artificially by ambient music or lighting can improve performance in non normal situations such as aircraft evacuations. All that marketing hype about cabin ambience might just have a safety benefit as well as the feel good message. For further information click here or contact Brett Molesworth (02 9385 6757 or b.molesworth@unsw.edu.au)

Droning on about the impact of remotely piloted vehicles (aka drones) has raised the old story about the aircraft cockpit of the future which has one human pilot and a dog. Undoubtedly at some point we will see pilotless aircraft sooner for freight, but eventually for passenger aircraft. UNSW Aviation has studied the potential passenger response to pilotless aircraft and modelled people’s sensitivity to the choice between aircraft piloted by on board crew vs a pilot on the ground. For further information click here or contact Brett Molesworth (02 9385 6757 or b.molesworth@unsw.edu.au) or Tay Koo (9385 6737 or t.koo@unsw.edu.au)

Pilot reporting behaviours and risk. Pilot reporting has improved over recent decades with the evolution of just culture and no blame reporting systems. But no system has perfect reporting, so UNSW Aviation researched the relationship between reporting and risk, depending on factors such as cockpit gradient and passengers on board and the level of risk involved in the incident. For further information here or contact Brett Molesworth (02 9385 6757 or b.molesworth@unsw.edu.au)

Accommodating automation. Research at UNSW Aviation evaluated the effect of prior exposure to automation on acceptance of new automation systems. Indications were that improved acceptance was possible with prior exposure. For further information here or contact Brett Molesworth (02 9385 6757 or b.molesworth@unsw.edu.au)